Monthly Reading Round Up: May 2017

In Order:

  • Daphne Du Maurier ‘Jamaica Inn’
  • R.K Narayan ‘Swami and Friends’
  • R.K Narayan ‘The Bachelor of Arts’
  • R.K Narayan ‘The English Teacher’

Not only is this May Reading Round Up Post really late, it’s also going to be rather pitiful in terms of content. Suppose that’s what I get for starting off so well in April- a high climb makes for a steep fall, and so my reading dwindles.

I do have my excuses, however! Firstly, I spent most of the month getting frazzled over preparing elaborate cosplay outfits for London MCM Comic Con (…where I then didn’t even wear half of the outfits… or wear them for long… but we won’t discuss that)- not to mention actually trying to get organised so I was ready to go and enjoy a weekend in the city. My second, rather much more pathetic excuse is that I had to put two books on the DNF (did not finish) list- The Age of Revolution: 1789-1848 by Eric Hobshawn, and The Celts by Alice Roberts. It probably says a lot about how scattered my mind was during this month, given how I couldn’t concentrate on history books concerning themselves with some of my favourite historical eras. Neither Hobshawn nor Roberts were bad or boring, it was just my brain refused to take in their narratives or their facts.

Yet what reading I did get done this month, I enjoyed immensely. I had the greatest of fun in rediscovering Daphne Du Maurier with her gothic-slash-thriller Jamaica Inn. It even inspired me to write a review on it, it caught my attention so much. Another brilliant find was in the writings of R.K Narayan in a collection called The Malgudi Omnibus- featuring three of his more central works that are set in his fictional town of Malgudi. While in each story, the characters and situations differ, it is the town of Malgudi that remains the same. In short, I simply fell in love hard and fast for Narayan’s style and wit. There’s a simplicity to his narrative that I appreciate so so much, because as a failed practitioner of the craft, I know how incredibly difficult it is to achieve. It makes for vivid reading, and an easy connection with his characters, who stretch and sparkle and reach out to the reader with their thoughts and struggles.

I probably have more to say- but this month has been difficult for me for a lot of reasons, and therefore it has been pretty difficult to write about. I know that I plan to return to Narayan in future, so here’s hoping that next time, I’ll have better words to use and better organisation of my thoughts.

May June be more fruitful for reading!

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